Home » The Ideology of Kokugo: Nationalizing Language in Modern Japan by Lee Yeounsuk
The Ideology of Kokugo: Nationalizing Language in Modern Japan Lee Yeounsuk

The Ideology of Kokugo: Nationalizing Language in Modern Japan

Lee Yeounsuk

Published October 1st 2009
ISBN : 9780824833053
Hardcover
262 pages
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 About the Book 

Available for the first time in English, The Ideology of Kokugo: Nationalizing Language in Modern Japan (1996) is Lee Yeounsuks award-winning look at the history and ideology behind the construction of kokugo (national language). Prior to the MeijiMoreAvailable for the first time in English, The Ideology of Kokugo: Nationalizing Language in Modern Japan (1996) is Lee Yeounsuks award-winning look at the history and ideology behind the construction of kokugo (national language). Prior to the Meiji period (1868-1912), the idea of a single, unified Japanese language did not exist. Only as Japan was establishing itself as a modern nation-state and an empire with expanding colonies did there arise the need for a national language to construct and sustain its national identity. Re-examining debates and controversies over genbun itchi (unification of written and spoken languages) and other language reform movements, Lee discusses the contributions of Ueda Kazutoshi (1867-1937) and Hoshina Kōichi (1872-1955) in the creation of kokugo and moves us one step closer to understanding how the ideology of kokugo cast a spell over linguistic identity in modern Japan. She examines the notion of the unshakable homogeneity of the Japanese language--a belief born of the political climate of early-twentieth-century Japan and its colonization of other East Asian countries--urging us to pay attention to the linguistic consciousness that underlies scientific scholarship and language policies. Her critical discussion of the construction of kokugo uncovers a strain of cultural nationalism that has been long nurtured in Japans education system and academic traditions. The ideology of kokugo, argues Lee, must be recognized both as an academic apparatus and a political concept.