Home » The Cavaliers by Samuel Robert Keightley
The Cavaliers Samuel Robert Keightley

The Cavaliers

Samuel Robert Keightley

Published
ISBN :
Nook
0 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:CHAPTER II. THE FIRST PLUNGE. One afternoon in the late autumn ofMorePurchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:CHAPTER II. THE FIRST PLUNGE. One afternoon in the late autumn of 1644, being anxious for news, I rode towards Beauchamp Town. No post had come with tidings for a week, only vagrant rumours that a battle had been fought, and the kings affairs had gone very ill. During all this time I had been but moody and discontented. While others had been winning renown, I had been playing goodman John at home- while the merry lads of Lunsford and Rupert were fighting for the king, I was fain to be content with spring sowing and autumn reaping—I who loved a good blade and gallant horse better than anything else in the world, and felt in my veins the fighting blood of far-off ancestors. At first I had not greatly murmured. When the king had raised his royal standard, though omens were not wanting, we, who knew no better, had thought his march would be a regal progress, and a month or two would see the insolent Parliament at his feet. We had vainly imagined that nothing could withstand the royal arms (so revered was the name of king), and we waited with a sense of certainty for the news of splendid victories. But the news did not come - rather we heard week by week how rebellion gathered head, how the Parliament had secured the ports and gathered levies and supplies, and how the king had only the devotion and courage of his faithful people to help him in his quarrel. As yet the tide of war had not rolled down our quiet valley, though many gentlemen had ridden away to join the king, among them being my brother Philip(late come from Oxford) and Percival Leigh, both setting out together. For myself, I had felt the trust committed to me by my father had tied my hands - my honour held me fast. So I chafed and murmured, listening eagerly for news, and riding daily to the town in hopes of ...