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Diary and Correspondence Volume 1 Samuel Pepys

Diary and Correspondence Volume 1

Samuel Pepys

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230200569
Paperback
168 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ... company, very wellMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ... company, very well pleased, and I too- it being the last dinner I intend to make a great while. Three dinners within a fortnight. 3d. (Lords day.) This day I first begun to go forth in my coate and sword, as the manner now among gentlemen is. In my way heard Mr. Thomas Fuller preach at the Savoy upon our forgiving of other mens trespasses, shewing among other things that we are to go to law never to revenge, but only to repayre, which I think a good distinction. To White Hall- where I staid to hear the trumpets and kettle-drums, and then the other drums, which are much cried up, though I think it dull, vulgar musick. So to Mr. Foxs unbidd-. where I had a good dinner and special company. Among other discourse, I observed one story, how my Lord of Northwich,1 at a public audience before the King of France, made the Duke of Anjou cry, by making ugly faces as he was stepping to the King, but undiscovered. And how Sir Phillip Warwicks2 lady did wonder to have Mr. Darcy send for several dozen bottles of Rhenish wine to her house, not knowing that the wine was his. Thence to my Lords- where I am told how Sir Tho 1 This story relates to circumstances which had occurred many years previously. George, Lord Goring, was sent by Charles I. as Ambassador Extraord1nary to France in 1644, to witness the oath of Louis xiv. to the observance of the treaties concluded with England by his father, Louis xiii., and his grandfather, Henry iv. Louis xiv. took this oath I at Ruel, on the 3d July, 1644, when he was not yet six years of age, and when his brother Philippe, then called Duke of Anjou, was not four years old. Shortly after his return home, Lord Goring was created, in September, 1644, Earl of Norwich, the title by which he is here mentioned....